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Cool Animals That Are Extinct images

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Soldadinho no pé de pinha / A "little soldier" in a sugar-apple tree
animals that are extinct
Image by Marcio Cabral de Moura
O cabeça-de-negro (Annona coriacea) é um arbusto ou árvore pequena da família das anonáceas, que ocorre no Brasil). Possui folhas ovadas, coriáceas, flores amarelas e frutos bacáceos múltiplos, grandes, comestíveis, com sementes tidas como antidiarréicas. Também é conhecido pelos nomes de araticum-do-campo, araticum-dos-lisos e marolinho.

O fruto, muito saboroso, é conhecido por fruta-do-conde, pelo fato da primeira muda da espécie, vinda das Antilhas, ter sido plantada na Bahia, em 1626, pelo governador Diogo Luís de Oliveira, o Conde de Miranda, conforme relato de Pio Corrêa. Em Pernambuco, Brasília e interior do estado do Rio de Janeiro a "fruta do conde" é conhecida como pinha, sendo plantada atualmente no Vale do São Francisco, incluindo a fruta modificada sem sementes. Somente em 1811, a espécie foi introduzida no Rio de Janeiro, por um agrônomo francês, a pedido do rei Dom João VI.

É também conhecido no Nordeste do Brasil como pinha ou ata. Quando está maduro, o fruto abre-se.

Wikipédia


Membracis foliata Linnaeus, 1758

kingdom Animalia - animals » phylum Arthropoda - arthropods » class Insecta - Insects » order Hemiptera - Bugs » family Membracidae - Treehoppers

Annona squamosa (also called sugar-apple, or sweetsop) is a species of Annona native to the tropical Americas. Its exact native range is unknown due to extensive cultivation, but thought to be in the Caribbean; the species was described from Jamaica. And in Indonesia it become extinct.

It is a semi-evergreen shrub or small tree reaching 6–8 meters (20–26 ft) tall. The leaves are alternate, simple, oblong-lanceolate, 5–17 cm (2.0–6.7 in) long and 2–5 centimeters (0.79–2.0 in) broad. The flowers are produced in clusters of 3-4, each flower 1.5–3 cm (0.59–1.2 in) across, with three large petals and three minute ones, yellow-green spotted purple at the base.

The fruit is usually round, slightly pine cone-like, 6–10 cm (2.4–3.9 in) diameter and weighing 100–230 g (3.5–8.1 oz), with a scaly or lumpy skin. There are variations in shape and size. The fruit flesh is sweet, white to light yellow, and resembles and tastes like custard. The edible portion coats the seeds generously; a bit like the gooey portion of a tomato seed. Sugar-apple has a very distinct, sweet-smelling fragrance. The texture of the flesh that coats the seeds is a bit like the center of a very ripe guava (excluding the seeds). It is slightly grainy, a bit slippery, very sweet and very soft. The seeds are scattered through the fruit flesh; the seed coats are blackish-brown, 12–18 mm (0.47–0.71 in) long, and hard and shiny.

There are also new varieties being developed in Taiwan. There is a pineapple sugar-apple, which is similar in sweetness but has a very different taste. Like the name suggests, it tastes like pineapple. The arrangement of seeds is in spaced rows, with the fruit's flesh filling most of the fruit and making grooves for the seeds, instead of the flesh only occurring around the seeds.

Wikipedia


Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis) DDZ_0050
animals that are extinct
Image by NDomer73
On 8 June 2008, three groups of adult Bighorn rams totaling 18-20 animals were observed grazing along Interstate 84 in the Columbia River Gorge near the John Day dam. One of the largest animals is shown here.

Two hundred years ago, Bighorn Sheep were widespread throughout the western United States, Canada, and Northern Mexico. Some estimates placed their population at higher than 2 million. However, by around 1900, hunting, competition from domesticated sheep, and diseases had decreased the population to only several thousand. A program of reintroductions, natural parks, and reduced hunting, together with a decrease in domesticated sheep near the end of World War II, allowed the Bighorn Sheep to make a comeback, though not before Ovis canadensis auduboni, a sub-species that lived on the Black Hills, went extinct.


Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis) DDZ_0059
animals that are extinct
Image by NDomer73
On 8 June 2008, three groups of adult Bighorn rams totaling 18-20 animals were observed grazing along Interstate 84 in the Columbia River Gorge near the John Day dam. The largest group, shown here, included 11 animals.

Two hundred years ago, Bighorn Sheep were widespread throughout the western United States, Canada, and Northern Mexico. Some estimates placed their population at higher than 2 million. However, by around 1900, hunting, competition from domesticated sheep, and diseases had decreased the population to only several thousand. A program of reintroductions, natural parks, and reduced hunting, together with a decrease in domesticated sheep near the end of World War II, allowed the Bighorn Sheep to make a comeback, though not before Ovis canadensis auduboni, a sub-species that lived on the Black Hills, went extinct.

 
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